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Check out the Facebook Live Video from Sunday Morning: https://www.facebook.com/northgatebuffalo/videos/10155464838614436/

It is all too easy to drift through our day-to-day life without glimpsing even a fraction of the grace God has so mercifully poured out over our lives and his creation. Pastor Penn Clark, in his first message of this year’s Holy Spirit Week, invited us to pause and catch a glimpse of what 1 Peter 4:10 calls the “manifold grace God.”

We can come to see God’s grace by considering the Church as analogous to the color spectrum. In the color spectrum there are three primary colors (red, yellow, and blue) from which, when blended to varying degrees, will produce an infinite array of possibilities. Grace is the same way. When God graces you, you look different than someone who has a different combination of colors. “Your Christianity,” Penn shared, “was never meant to be monochrome” (i.e., black and white). Instead, God intends for new life in Christ to be as rich, beautiful, and color-full as the seemingly infinite hues of the color spectrum.

Another way we can come to glimpse the abundant riches of God’s grace is by observing the infinite creativity with which he has made the cosmos. Of the innumerable and yet perfectly designed snowflakes that have so gently graced not just Buffalo, but the whole world, or the boundless burning orbs of brilliance floating in a sea of gravitational waves, no two have ever been or will ever be exactly alike. In the same infinitely creative way, God wants to adorn you with his grace—his Holy Spirit. 

This idea came home for Penn one night when he, as he said, became “deliriously happy with the realization” that God had graced him with so much. Penn got out bed, grabbed a few sheets of acetate paper, drew the outline of the human person and began to pen everything for which he had been thanking the Lord. With sheet after sheet layered on top of each other, Penn noted all the ways God had generously graced him. Afterward, when Penn had finished ferociously writing, he stepped back and realized that, as a new man created in Christ Jesus, he was “‘badder than Darth Vader.” God had armed him with more gifts than he had realized. But these gifts, all God’s graces, were not about looking good, like a boyscout with his merit badges.  Instead, they were generously given to be given generously away (see the rest of 1 Peter 4:10).

Penn’s concluding invitation was to pause from the day-to-day routines during Holy Spirit Week and really pursue the abundance of grace that God has to offer. God is inviting you to hunger for and covet the grace that he has for you. How will you respond?